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Tashkent Agreement Signed By Pakistani President

In accordance with Tashkent`s statement, ministerial talks were held on 1 and 2 March 1966. Despite the fact that these talks were unproductive, diplomatic exchanges continued in the spring and summer. The results of these discussions were not obtained due to differences of opinion on the Kashmir issue. The news of Tashkent`s statement shocked the people of Pakistan, who expected India to make more concessions than they got. Things got even worse when Ayub Khan refused to speak and went to solitary confinement instead of announcing the reasons for signing the agreement. Protests and riots took place at various locations in Pakistan. [3] To dispel the anger and concerns of the people, Ayub Khan decided to take the matter before the people on 14 January 1966. This is the difference with Tashkent`s statement that eventually led to the impeachment of Zulfikar Ali Bhutto from the Ayub government, which later founded his own party, the Pakistan People`s Party. Although Ayub Khan was able to satisfy the concerns of the people, Tashkent`s declaration significantly tarnished his image and was one of the factors that led to his downfall.

[8] VI The Indian Prime Minister and the President of Pakistan agreed to consider measures to restore economic and trade relations, communication and cultural exchanges between India and Pakistan and to take steps to implement existing agreements between India and Pakistan. The agreement between India and Pakistan, which ended the largest military conflict over territorial disputes since World War II, was signed on 10 January 1966 in Tashkent, the capital of the Uzbek SSR at the time. At the opening of the negotiations, the conflict between India and Pakistan seriously threatened the stability of the region. This conflict between two major regional powers threatened to degenerate into a much greater war with the participation of other states. India was threatened by China, which was then an ally of Pakistan. Beijing has accused Delhi of aggression. An agreement signed by Indian Prime Minister Lal Bahadur Shastri and Pakistani President Ayub Khan in the Soviet city of Tashkent to end the Second Indo-Pakistan War on Kashmir. The two countries agreed not only to withdraw their troops from the territory of the other region and to recover their prisoners of war, but also to begin to normalize their diplomatic relations. Unfortunately, the beginning of Indo-Pakistani friendly relations was made more difficult by Shastri`s death a few hours after the signing of the agreement. The agreement has done little to ease the deep hostility between the two countries since independence in 1947 and did not prevent the outbreak of new hostilities in 1970. Muhammad Ayub Khan (1907-1974) President of Pakistan However, the ceasefire was fragile and the conflict could have resumed at any time.

The Soviet Union felt the need for a more binding agreement and proposed to act as a mediator, with the personal participation of Kosygin, President of the Council of Ministers of the USSR. According to The Memoirs of contemporaries, Kosygin played a crucial role in finding a solution to the Indo-Pakistani conflict, as he enjoyed the confidence of both sides. The fiftieth anniversary of the Tashkent Declaration, an agreement ending hostilities between India and Pakistan, was celebrated on Sunday (January 10th). The declaration was signed in the Soviet Union after the mediation of Soviet diplomacy under the personal leadership of Alexei Kosygin, head of the Council of Ministers. This document is considered to be one of the best examples of the Soviet Union`s diplomatic mediation in world policy, even if the resulting peace did not last long.